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The Cupcake Lessons

Since my side job is being a scientist I have, obviously, been hard at work collaborating with other special brainiacs who are interested in the world wobbling subjects I am, one of which is a compilation of people who should never marry certain people and use a hyphenated name. Here are the Top Ten:

1. News personality Connie Chung and tennis player Michael Chang
2. Actor George Clooney and comedian Paul Mooney
3. Comedian WC Fields and actress Brooke Shields
4. Actor Paul Schneider and actor Roy Scheider
5. Brutal Dictator Pol Pot and fashion designer Edith Head
6. Actor Zach Galiafinakis and musician Meshell Ndegeocello
7. Former First Lady Betty Ford and actor Harrison Ford
8. Actor Sissy Spacek and actor Kevin Spacey
9. Actor Joel Grey and actress Karen Black
10.Actor Arnold Schwarzenegger and scientist Albert Schweitzer

The Cupcake Lessons

Last Day

Look, that gorgeous pink sky slips
Into greys and blacks and hopes
While I’m busy holding
the unfolding
Bursting
Retreating things
I keep under a blanket near my heart

Don’t tell me what I’ve done wrong
Only comfort me with what you know

As the last day of the year
Slithers into the new
I want to be ready for sustenance
and pride
I want to be prepared for only all
the wonderful traces that
Whisper the road of where I’ve been

Don’t remind me of places I didn’t go
Only coax me forward
Toward unrelenting hopefulness
Never fully untethered
From where I’m meant to be

The Cupcake Lessons

pathSweetness Comes To Whisper Your Life Story

You arrived here, confused and you spent most of your time learning your one life.
The story is old and goes back forever:
You get this one life.
The way you hold your life will reveal if you feel your life holding you.

First, you were born.

As a young girl you bathed yourself in fear on a daily basis.
Strong fear that moved mountains and cleaned up blood.
Bold fear that stopped hearts and furnished strength and motivation.
Sweet fear that rinsed away cowardice and hesitation in the house where you lived.

Being afraid most hours of the day made you weary and it also gave you your Wound.
The essence of your Sweetness was that you tried very diligently.
The essence of your Sweetness is your Wound.

You always seemed to know that your Sweetness was weighed down with a certain sense of grasping and dying to please.
You identified this as despair and you made a concerted effort to temper it with anything that flowed.

You were scrawny, like a reed. You entered dodgeball games with humans five times your size. Your predilection for being accepted was so strong that you threw your flimsy body in the line of fire. Your broken arm was your mark of valor. All you knew was that you tried and people witnessed you trying.

All you knew is that, for several moments, you were in the thick of it—you were part of it.
And this is where much of your Sweetness resides—your ability to step outside of yourself and observe what you do.

That bit of groundedness that anchors you after a long hard struggle is like nourishment to you. You’ve learned and studied how and where to find your nourishment as you’ve felt along your bumpy path.

You knew you preferred sturdy Sweetness early on.
The type of deep Sweetness that abides next to stomach-churning strength from the most weathered part of your soul.
It’s weathered because of all it’s seen and heard.
You cling to this fact about yourself and you put two and two together:
There is such Sweetness in mustering up courage—the bright and shiniest kind.

Sweetness became the soft blanket you draped over your shoulders when no one was looking.

In 3rd grade you were the teacher’s pet and, although you loved this feeling right down to your knee socks, you understood that the intoxicating and foreign warmth of being the favorite was short-lived because other children wanted to be the favorite too. You began to understand that there are times when adults or other kids think you’re special. You’re drawn to this feeling. You start to develop a set formula for creating this feeling.

This becomes the blueprint for your life.

You enter Middle School and you make it your business to know other people’s business in ways a comforting therapist would. You really are ahead of your time, the way you are able to hone in on that one thing that, upon reflection back to the person, will make them feel worthy and good.

You are very adept at mining for and discovering Sweetness in others.

You know that this is how you’ll make your way in the world. You’ll be a Sweetness Mirror. You’ll slither here and there and you’ll gaze at and do whatever it takes to reflect the glowiest parts back to people in order for them to love you.

But at a certain point, your sweetness begins to fade.

So much of your energy is emblazoned onto other people that you become invisible. When you take only a moment to put any sort of momentum into your own trajectory you could easily propel yourself around the moon.

You’re too busy polishing and shining others to notice this.

You know that the worst thing in the world is feeling unwanted and so you create a potion to sprinkle over whoever you feel you want or need and then that person stays in your orbit—your orbit that is lopsided and off course and unpredictable.

And you struggle forward. And your reflection in the eyes of the people you picked often frightened you. You saw them seeing you, in the wrong way. But you knew that you would never correct their view. You knew that the unspoken promise was that you existed for them and your existence did not matter.

And when your rage began, it began not so much as a way to get even or to express your stunted sense of unfairness— it began as a result of a simmering over. Your furious, true soul started to notice how often you ignored your simple, clear instinct and you started to keep track of the way you allowed your own dismissal.

You started to see that the people you chose to admire and build up were the exact people who never seemed satisfied with the gleam in your eye or the sparkle of your smile and you began to understand that you had purchased a ticket for admittance onto a ride that would be your demise.

But you continued to do the same thing. You continued to admire when you didn’t respect and you continued to adore when you didn’t like. And this was the beginning of the end for you. This was how your started to wake up from your cozy cave of denial. This was when you understood that the only person you needed to be fearful of alienating and losing was you.

This is what Sweetness came to tell you when it sat down next to you and regaled you with the story of your life.

It tapped at your window to whisper into your ear that your gorgeous falling apart was the best thing that could have happened because the soft space that’s created there is where Sweetness relies on to thrive—that space, in between the rage and secrets—where everything other than love is melted by light.

The Cupcake Lessons

NancyTheGhoulAs Hollow Wienie approaches, I’ve arranged for Nancy the Ghoul to share her Five Essential Behaviors of Successful Goblins. Not that it really matters, but Nancy threatened to put a curse on my family if I did not pay her per second for putting this list together and only acquiesced when I threatened to take her off my door and throw her in the garbage, but I just thought that, as an FYI, that would add to the horror here.

Nancy the Ghouls Five Essential Behaviors of Successful Goblins:
1. Have a scary expression. Not an expression that is mildly unsettling but an expression that includes few teeth and an eerie Christina Aguilera on speed face.
2. Highlight your long string bean legs by wearing black clunky boots. This is a must.
3. If you have a pot belly make sure you wear a wide belt and hot pants to draw attention to this figure flaw. Bloat scares people. You’re supposed to be scary. Don’t forget this.
4. Keep your arms our wide at all times. This creates a menacing, murderer vibe and it’s what you should be going for.
5. Make sure your cape is flowy and breezy. It should freak dogs and children out simply because it moves with the wind even when you don’t.

When In Doubt Say Boo,
Nancy the Ghoul, MFCC, PhD, MD, DDS

The Cupcake Lessons

As you may or may not know I have been researching sound to ear effectiveness with several teams of lanky scientists who subsist solely on Pringles and they, along with me and my Madame Curie input, have come to the conclusion that when you are watching a tennis match and you scream orders, wishes, prayers or instructions at the television like a wild baboon in pursuit of several wounded gazelles, there is a .005% chance that the players will hear you.

Just Because the Message Wasn’t Received Doesn’t Mean It’s Not Worth Sending,
Yolanda the Yeller